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1 edition of Trachoma and allied infections in a Gambian village found in the catalog.

Trachoma and allied infections in a Gambian village

Trachoma and allied infections in a Gambian village

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Published by HMSO in London .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementShiona Sowa ... [et al.].
SeriesSpecial report series / Medical Research Council -- 308
ContributionsSowa, Shiona.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21184241M

  Trachoma remains a major problem, particularly among girls and women, in much of sub-Saharan Africa, areas of the Middle East crescent, and pockets of Asia and South America. Eliminating trachoma, while possible, will require a rededication to prevention strategies and a focus on disease control as a gender-sensitive intervention. M.R.C. Trachoma Unit, Medical Research Council Laboratories, Fajara, The Gambia Entropion-trichiasis is seen mainlyin adults. It wasobserved onlyin old people in South West Africa (Eiselen and Gear, I), and in Casamance was rarely present in children under I5 years and not at all in infants (Vellieux, Le Breton, Oliveau, and Larmane, I).


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Trachoma and allied infections in a Gambian village Download PDF EPUB FB2

Of 60 TRIC agents isolated from Gambian children with trachoma, 25 were serotype 1 and the remainder type 2. There was a pronounced Trachoma and allied infections in a Gambian village book in the proportions of these types in the two villages studied. In the village with a predominance of type 2 strains, TRIC agents remained confined to 2 adjacent compounds over a 14 month observation period.

The investigations which are described in this book were carried out by workers from the MRC's Trachoma Research Unit. They cite the isolation of the causal micro-organism by Chinese workers infollowed by the isolation of similar agents in the Gambia by workers under the direction of Dr.

Collier. Similar investigations were carried out at the Institute of Cited by: Get this from a library. Trachoma and allied infections in a Gambian village [by] Shiona Sowa [et al.].

[Shiona Sowa]. We present longitudinal data on the prevalence of active inflammatory trachoma in one Gambian village over a year period. Marakissa is a small rural village with a current population of around people and is typical of villages in The Gambia.

Trachoma and allied infections in a Gambian village. Medical Research Council, Special Cited by:   The first trachoma survey of Marakissa village was done in by the Medical Research Council. 3 The village was surveyed again in4 and in by the Gambian National Eye Care Programme.

In each survey the eyes of every person in the village were examined with a binocular loupe to find the prevalence and clinical stages of by: A longitudinal study of trachoma in a Gambian village: Implications concerning the pathogenesis of chlamydial infection Article (PDF Available) in Epidemiology and Infection (2).

The Lancet GENITAL AND NEONATAL CHLAMYDIAL INFECTION IN A TRACHOMA ENDEMIC AREA D.C.W. Mabey H.C. Whittle Medical Research Council Laboratories, Fajara, The Gambia 85 consecutive male patients with urethritis attending the Medical Research Council outpatient department in Fajara, The Gambia, were investigated for Chlamydia trachomatis infection.

Trachoma and allied infections in a Gambian village. Sowa S, Sowa J, Collier LH, Blyth W Spec Rep Ser Med Res Counc (G B),01 Jan   The Gambian Example. The Gambia was the site of randomized controlled drug trials testing the efficacy of azithromycin, 15, 16 It was also, according to Emerson, a place where many of the ideas about the environmental improvement parts of the SAFE strategy were tested.

As director of the International Trachoma Initiative, Emerson now regularly speaks. Schroeder, Richard A. Shady Practices: Agroforestry and Gender Politics in the Gambia, Sowa, Shiona, et al. Trachoma and Allied Infections in a Gambian Village, Wright, Donald R. Oral Traditions from the Gambia.

Spec Rep Ser Med Res Counc (G B). ; Trachoma and allied infections in a Gambian village. Sowa S, Sowa J, Collier LH, Blyth W. This study investigated risk factors for active trachoma and ocular Chlamydia trachomatis infection in children aged below 10 years in two Gambian regions.

The overall prevalence of C. trachomatis infection was only % (3/) compared with % (/) for active trachoma, therefore analyses were only performed for active trachoma. Trachoma and allied infections in a Gambian village, Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London (), p.

71 Medical Research Council, Special Report Series No. Google Scholar. Abstract. In order to investigate risk factors for the acquisition of trachoma, and to study the effect of continued exposure to ocular chlamydial infection on the severity of inflammatory trachoma and its cicatricial sequelae, a longitudinal study was conducted in a Gambian village.

Background. Trachoma, caused by ocular infection with Chlamydia trachomatis, is hyperendemic on the Bijagós Archipelago of Guinea understanding of the risk factors associated with active trachoma and infection on these remote and isolated islands, which are atypical of trachoma-endemic environments described elsewhere, is crucial to the implementation of trachoma.

Re-infection by trachoma agent may be another major contributory factor to chron ic trachoma. There exist many opportunities for similar comparisons of population in different parts of the world. Such studies would further clarify the effect of environ mental factors on diseases.

The Gambian Example. The Gambia was the site of randomized controlled drug trials testing the efficacy of azithromycin. 14, 15, 16 It was also, according to Emerson, a place where many of the ideas about the environmental improvement parts of the SAFE strategy were tested.

As director of the International Trachoma Initiative, Emerson now regularly speaks. This study investigated risk factors for active trachoma and ocular Chlamydia trachomatis infection in children aged below 10 years in two Gambian regions. The overall prevalence of C.

trachomatis infection was only % (3/) compared with % (/) for active trachoma, therefore analyses were only performed for active trachoma.

Professor Leslie Collier, who died on March 14 a was a virologist and bacteriologist who built on the earlier work of such scientists as Edward Jenner in helping to develop a vaccine that. Methodology/Principal Findings. We analysed data on the prevalence of ocular infection with Chlamydia trachomatis and of active trachoma disease among 4, individuals from two communities in The Gambia (West Africa) and two communities in Tanzania (East Africa).

An age- and household-structured mathematical model of transmission was fitted to these data. The Natural History of Trachoma Infection and Disease in a Gambian Cohort with Frequent in all children aged 1 to 5 years from each intervention village. trachoma control interventions can be aided through knowledge of risk factors.

We aimed to assess the prevalence of, and risk factors for, both active trachoma and ocular C. trachomatis infection pre-treatment in The Gambia and Tanzania, as part of the Partnership for the Rapid Elimination of Trachoma (PRET) cluster randomised controlled trial.

CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): Background: The natural history of ocular Chlamydia trachomatis infections in endemic communities has not been well characterised and is an important determinant of the effectiveness of different mass treatment strategies to prevent blindness due to trachoma.

Trachoma and allied infections in a Gambian village. Medical Research Council special report series no Recently quantitative real-time PCR has been used to measure the load of C. trachomatis infection in members of trachoma endemic communities to better define the major reservoirs of infection and monitor response to treatment.

10, 17, 19, 28 Currently, a point-of-care rapid diagnostic test is being developed which may be of use to trachoma. In The Gambia, S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae type B infection correlated closely with signs of active trachoma in communities that had previously received MDA, whereas Moraxella catarrhalis and.

Trachoma is the most common infectious cause of blindness. Repeated episodes of infection with Chlamydia trachomatis in childhood lead to severe conjunctival inflammation, scarring, and potentially blinding inturned eyelashes (trichiasis or entropion) in later life.

Trachoma occurs in resource-poor areas with inadequate hygiene, where children with unclean faces share. Mass antibiotic treatment and facial cleanliness are central to WHO's strategy for the elimination of blindness caused by trachoma. Recent studies have highlighted the heterogeneous response of communities to mass treatment and the complex relation between infection with Chlamydia trachomatis and clinical disease.

It is important to be able to explain these findings to predict. Trachoma is an infectious eye disease caused by the bacterium Chlamydia is the leading infectious cause of blindness worldwide [1,2,3].Children who have the active stages of the disease are the reservoir of infection [].Recurrent episodes of infection and the associated chronic conjunctival inflammation initiate a scarring process that ultimately leads to irreversible.

Trachoma disappeared from much of Western Europe before the widespread use of antibiotics. Recent reports have indicated that this secular trend continues in other areas now affected by trachoma. One study found that the prevalence of active trachoma had decreased from 66% to 4% between and in a single Gambian village.

It has been stated “there is possibility that The Gambia can eliminate trachoma” in the world campaign to combat the eye disease by In Africa, The Gambia, Mali and Ghana are said to be leading in trying to eliminate trachoma.

However, we. Trachoma is widely distributed in sub-Saharan Africa and is mainly associated with poor water accessibility. However, these associations have never been demonstrated in some of the communities, especially in northern Tanzania. To cover that gap, the present case control study was conducted to assess the association of water related factors, general hygiene and active trachoma.

According to him, it is estimated that about million people have active trachoma and nearly six million people are blind, due to complications associated with repeat infections. He explained that, it is an infectious eye disease that can eventually cause blindness, if left untreated. The application of a diagnostic and genotyping technique based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to the study of trachoma epidemiology in the Gambian village of Jali is reported.

Book reviewed in this article: Berg, Frederik: Ophthalmology in Sweden in the 19th century. Diagnosis and Therapy of the Glaucomas.

2nd ed. Shiona Sowa, J. Sowa, L. Collier & W. Blyth: Trachoma and allied infections in a Gambian village. Ciba Foundation Symposium: Colour Vision.

Sowa, L. Collier & W. Blyth: Trachoma and allied. In village 1, there were 3 preschool children aged 2 years (female), 4 years (female), and 4 years (male) who tested positive for chlamydia.

In village 2, a single year-old girl was found to be infected. In village 3, all individuals tested negative for infection. (5,6) Decades of trachoma control and experimentation here are keeping children from the harmful cycle of trachoma infection and reinfection, and are helping people like Awa Jallow deal with the disease's legacy.

The Gambia's small size and small population made it a perfect laboratory for testing new solutions to an old crisis. The Epidemiology of Trachoma in Mozambique: Results of 96 Population-Based Prevalence Surveys. Ophthalmic Epidemiology: Vol. 25, Global Trachoma.

In writing this paper I have made an attempt, inadequate though it is, to seek explanations for some of the more puzzling manifestations of ophthalmic infections caused by TRIC agents. We have in the past possibly taken too naive a view of these syndromes, regarding features such as follicles and pannus purely from the viewpoint of a simple inflammatory process, and without.

It is well known that not all cases of clinically active trachoma also have concurrent infection, particularly in low prevalence areas [2, 6–9]. A report from 1 village in Australia found only 17% of clinically active cases had.

Clinical and Other Features of Infection of the Genital Tract Associated With Trachoma, Rev Int TrachomeSowa, S., et al: Trachoma and Allied Infections in a Gambian Village, Med Res Counc Mem SRS88 pages.BACKGROUND As part of the second National Survey of Blindness and Low Vision in the Gambia carried out inall survey participants were examined for signs of trachoma.

The findings were compared with the results of the first survey inwhich used the same sampling strategy. METHODS A multistage stratified cluster random sample, with proportional.

C. trachomatis infection rates ranged from 17 to 44 percent. The researchers then gave everyone in one village in each country azithromycin, erythromycin, or amoxicillin pills once a week for up to 3 weeks. People in the other village got eye ointment containing tetracycline, the common treatment for trachoma, once a day for up to 6 weeks.